Archive for October, 2016

The Effect of the Embargo Act of 1807

Posted in Early National Years on October 27, 2016 by mrkufs

Jefferson’s Embargo Act of 1807 cut off trade with England and France.  It ended up costing America far more than it did the two European powers.  This political cartoon shows the snapping turtle as the Embargo Act nicking American Merchants.Ograbme

The Duel

Posted in Early National Years on October 27, 2016 by mrkufs

Hamilton and Burr’s famous duel explained in a minute or so.

One Minute Louisiana Purchase

Posted in Uncategorized with tags on October 27, 2016 by mrkufs

Disney’s 3 Minute #2 John Adams Biography

Posted in 1790's on October 24, 2016 by mrkufs

Election of 1800

Posted in Early National Years on October 21, 2016 by mrkufs

The Election of 1800 explained.

Hamilton Explains National Bank

Posted in 1790's on October 20, 2016 by mrkufs

Alexander Hamilton, Secretary of the Treasury under Washington, explains the need for the National Bank-much to the dismay of Thomas Jefferson, Secretary of State.

1790’s Notes- A Checklist

Posted in 1790's on October 20, 2016 by mrkufs

1790’s APUSH NOTES

Hamilton’s Financial Plan:

Citizen Genet Incident:

Jay Treaty:

Pinckney Treaty:

Washington’s Farewell Address:

XYZ Affair:

Alien and Sedition Acts:

Election of 1800:

 

Cabinet Battle #1

Posted in 1790's on October 18, 2016 by mrkufs

Study Guide for Articles/Constitution Exam

Posted in Uncategorized on October 18, 2016 by mrkufs

Here is a study guide for the October 20 Unit Exam on the Constitution and Articles of Confederation:

  1. Reread Amsco Book pages 91-94 and 103-109.
  2. Study Federalism and know the powers that are divided into Fed/State/Both
  3. Know ALL 10 Amendments
  4. Know the terms from the notes like unwritten Constitution, lobbying, the Elastic Clause, census, etc.
  5. Understand checks and balances and the three branches of government
  6. Know all four compromises
  7. Know the key names from the Constitutional Convention and their intent and methods
  8. Understand the “genius” of the Constitution and be able to elaborate

A Republic or Democracy?

Posted in Constitutional Era on October 11, 2016 by mrkufs

This 10:00 documentary explains specifically how the United States was more of a Republic and not a pure democracy.  Pay attention to particular parts that mention that specifically.

Bill of Rights Explained by Mr. Kufs

Posted in Constitutional Era on October 11, 2016 by mrkufs

The Definition of Federalism in 13 Seconds

Posted in Constitutional Era with tags , on October 11, 2016 by mrkufs

“With Honors” Clip About The Genius of the Constitution

Posted in Constitutional Era on October 7, 2016 by mrkufs

Joe Pesci plays the role of a bum on the Harvard campus in this powerful scene. Pesci explains to an arrogant professor that the founding fathers might have only been farmers but they were geniuses because they knew that they were not perfect-and times change. They created a flexible, living document. And most of all the President is not a king but really just a bum, a servant of the people.

Land Ordinance of 1785

Posted in Constitutional Era on October 6, 2016 by mrkufs

land-ordinance

The Articles of Confederation Were…

Posted in Constitutional Era with tags on October 4, 2016 by mrkufs

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