Market Revolution Era With John Green

Posted in Early National Years on November 17, 2014 by mrkufs

Watch from :30 to 5:00 for a summary of the Nationalism/Economic Growth Era of 1816-1848 in America.

The Monroe Doctrine (1823)

Posted in Early National Years on November 13, 2014 by mrkufs

A VERY brief explanation of 5th President James Monroe’s most important accomplishment-a statement that Europe was not to meddle with land in the Western Hemisphere.

The Missouri Compromise (1820)

Posted in Early National Years on November 13, 2014 by mrkufs
Henry Clay, Chairman of the Select Committee o...

Henry Clay, Chairman of the Select Committee on the Various Propositions for the Admission of Missouri into the Union (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The United States in 1819. The Missouri Compro...

The United States in 1819. The Missouri Compromise prohibited slavery in the unorganized territory of the Great Plains (dark green) and permitted it in Missouri (yellow) and the Arkansas Territory (lower blue area). (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Excellent 7 minute explanation of the Missouri Compromise and past DBQ essays and Free Response Essay questions from APUSH exams about the topic.

Remember, Henry Clay works the Compromise and Maine is admitted as a free state and Missouri as a slave state. All future territory in the west above the 36 30″ line of latitude will be free. It lasts 34 years but DOES NOT solve the problem for good.

Story of the Star Spangled Banner

Posted in Early National Years on November 11, 2014 by mrkufs

The real story behind our National Anthem.

APUSH 1812 Free Response Essay

Posted in Early National Years on November 10, 2014 by mrkufs

APUSH LONG ESSAY: Wednesday, November 19th…timed for 35 minutes/no notes; in class.

Choose one of the following and write an essay including the following:

-intro paragraph w/ a thesis statement (5-8 sentences and the thesis underlined)

-body paragraphs reflecting the thesis (COULD BE TWO or THREE 5-8 sentences each)

-a brief conclusion (2-4 sentences)

REMEMBER TO STRESS THE WHY!

1. Explain the influence of each of the following on the U.S. decision to go to war in 1812: 

EMBARGO POLICIES OF JEFFERSON AND MADISON and the BRITISH IMPRESSMENT OF AMERICAN SEAMEN

SETTLERS CONFLICTS WITH AMERICAN INDIANS

EXPANSIONISTS GOALS OF THE WARHAWKS

 2. Explain the significance of the Louisiana Purchase in American History.  Be sure to include:

our initial motivation; Napoleon’s reason to sell; to what extent did Jefferson violate his avowed Constitutional principles when he accepted the Louisiana Purchase; and the consequences and effects of buying it.

The Effect of the Embargo Act of 1807

Posted in Early National Years on November 7, 2014 by mrkufs

Jefferson’s Embargo Act of 1807 cut off trade with England and France.  It ended up costing America far more than it did the two European powers.  This political cartoon shows the snapping turtle as the Embargo Act nicking American Merchants.Ograbme

One Minute Louisiana Purchase

Posted in Uncategorized with tags on November 5, 2014 by mrkufs

New Test Correction Policy for Major Assessments

Posted in Test Things on November 5, 2014 by mrkufs

APUSH/SUNY 105-106

Multiple Choice Corrections 

APUSH/SUNY 105-106 students have the opportunity to earn an extra quiz grade for multiple choice corrections that they get wrong on a test.  In order to gain credit the following steps MUST be met:

  1. Turn in corrections with the original sheet
  2. Missed questions must have the correct answer.
  3. Explain WHY you put the answer that you did and why you know that the new answer is correct. These explanations are meant to be prose, not poetry.  The explanation is meant to make you reflect on your thought process.
  4. Where you specifically found the correct answer.
  5. Turn in the corrections by the deadline set by Mr. Kufs

INCORRECT SAMPLE:

#6.  D I guessed wrong.  I found the answer in my book.

CORRECT SAMPLE:

#6.  New Answer:  D- I got #6 wrong because I thought that the Puritans came to the New World to get rich.  In reality, they came for religious freedom.  The answer was found on page 25 of Amsco. (or from the website link or whatever)

The Duel

Posted in Early National Years on November 4, 2014 by mrkufs

Hamilton and Burr’s famous duel explained in a minute or so.

Disney’s 3 Minute #2 John Adams Biography

Posted in 1790's on November 2, 2014 by mrkufs

Hamilton Explains National Bank

Posted in 1790's on October 29, 2014 by mrkufs

Alexander Hamilton, Secretary of the Treasury under Washington, explains the need for the National Bank-much to the dismay of Thomas Jefferson, Secretary of State.

Alexander Hamilton Rap

Posted in 1790's on October 29, 2014 by mrkufs

To know Alexander Hamilton’s life you could learn from this epic rap in front of the President and First Lady.

1790′s Notes- A Checklist

Posted in 1790's on October 29, 2014 by mrkufs

1790’s APUSH NOTES

Hamilton’s Financial Plan:

Citizen Genet Incident:

Jay Treaty:

Pinckney Treaty:

Washington’s Farewell Address:

XYZ Affair:

Alien and Sedition Acts:

Election of 1800:

 

A Republic or Democracy?

Posted in Constitutional Era on October 27, 2014 by mrkufs

This 10:00 documentary explains specifically how the United States was more of a Republic and not a pure democracy.  Pay attention to particular parts that mention that specifically.

The Bill of Rights

Posted in Uncategorized on October 23, 2014 by mrkufs

BILL OF RIGHTS

Amendment I

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.


Amendment II

A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.


Amendment III

No Soldier shall, in time of peace be quartered in any house, without the consent of the Owner, nor in time of war, but in a manner to be prescribed by law.


Amendment IV

The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.


Amendment V

No person shall be held to answer for a capital, or otherwise infamous crime, unless on a presentment or indictment of a Grand Jury, except in cases arising in the land or naval forces, or in the Militia, when in actual service in time of War or public danger; nor shall any person be subject for the same offence to be twice put in jeopardy of life or limb; nor shall be compelled in any criminal case to be a witness against himself, nor be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor shall private property be taken for public use, without just compensation.


Amendment VI

In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the right to a speedy and public trial, by an impartial jury of the State and district wherein the crime shall have been committed, which district shall have been previously ascertained by law, and to be informed of the nature and cause of the accusation; to be confronted with the witnesses against him; to have compulsory process for obtaining witnesses in his favor, and to have the Assistance of Counsel for his defense.


Amendment VII

In suits at common law, where the value in controversy shall exceed twenty dollars, the right of trial by jury shall be preserved, and no fact tried by a jury, shall be otherwise reexamined in any Court of the United States, than according to the rules of the common law.


Amendment VIII

Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted.


Amendment IX

The enumeration in the Constitution, of certain rights, shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people.


Amendment X

The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people

How A Bill Becomes A Law

Posted in Uncategorized on October 21, 2014 by mrkufs

“With Honors” Clip About The Genius of the Constitution

Posted in Constitutional Era on October 10, 2014 by mrkufs

Joe Pesci plays the role of a bum on the Harvard campus in this powerful scene. Pesci explains to an arrogant professor that the founding fathers might have only been farmers but they were geniuses because they knew that they were not perfect-and times change. They created a flexible, living document. And most of all the President is not a king but really just a bum, a servant of the people.

The Articles of Confederation Were…

Posted in Constitutional Era with tags on October 7, 2014 by mrkufs

WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK  WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK  WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK  WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK

Actors Recite the Declaration of Independence

Posted in American Revolution on October 2, 2014 by mrkufs

A gripping read of America’s most powerful words. From Mel Gibson to Whoopi Goldberg-Hollywood reads the Declaration of Independence.

Liberty Kids- Second Continental Congress

Posted in Uncategorized on October 1, 2014 by mrkufs

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