The Duel

Posted in Early National Years on October 31, 2014 by mrkufs

Hamilton and Burr’s famous duel explained in a minute or so.

Hamilton Explains National Bank

Posted in 1790's on October 29, 2014 by mrkufs

Alexander Hamilton, Secretary of the Treasury under Washington, explains the need for the National Bank-much to the dismay of Thomas Jefferson, Secretary of State.

Alexander Hamilton Rap

Posted in 1790's on October 29, 2014 by mrkufs

To know Alexander Hamilton’s life you could learn from this epic rap in front of the President and First Lady.

1790’s Notes- A Checklist

Posted in 1790's on October 29, 2014 by mrkufs

1790’s APUSH NOTES

Hamilton’s Financial Plan:

Citizen Genet Incident:

Jay Treaty:

Pinckney Treaty:

Washington’s Farewell Address:

XYZ Affair:

Alien and Sedition Acts:

Election of 1800:

 

A Republic or Democracy?

Posted in Constitutional Era on October 27, 2014 by mrkufs

This 10:00 documentary explains specifically how the United States was more of a Republic and not a pure democracy.  Pay attention to particular parts that mention that specifically.

The Bill of Rights

Posted in Uncategorized on October 23, 2014 by mrkufs

BILL OF RIGHTS

Amendment I

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.


Amendment II

A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.


Amendment III

No Soldier shall, in time of peace be quartered in any house, without the consent of the Owner, nor in time of war, but in a manner to be prescribed by law.


Amendment IV

The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.


Amendment V

No person shall be held to answer for a capital, or otherwise infamous crime, unless on a presentment or indictment of a Grand Jury, except in cases arising in the land or naval forces, or in the Militia, when in actual service in time of War or public danger; nor shall any person be subject for the same offence to be twice put in jeopardy of life or limb; nor shall be compelled in any criminal case to be a witness against himself, nor be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor shall private property be taken for public use, without just compensation.


Amendment VI

In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the right to a speedy and public trial, by an impartial jury of the State and district wherein the crime shall have been committed, which district shall have been previously ascertained by law, and to be informed of the nature and cause of the accusation; to be confronted with the witnesses against him; to have compulsory process for obtaining witnesses in his favor, and to have the Assistance of Counsel for his defense.


Amendment VII

In suits at common law, where the value in controversy shall exceed twenty dollars, the right of trial by jury shall be preserved, and no fact tried by a jury, shall be otherwise reexamined in any Court of the United States, than according to the rules of the common law.


Amendment VIII

Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted.


Amendment IX

The enumeration in the Constitution, of certain rights, shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people.


Amendment X

The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people

How A Bill Becomes A Law

Posted in Uncategorized on October 21, 2014 by mrkufs

“With Honors” Clip About The Genius of the Constitution

Posted in Constitutional Era on October 10, 2014 by mrkufs

Joe Pesci plays the role of a bum on the Harvard campus in this powerful scene. Pesci explains to an arrogant professor that the founding fathers might have only been farmers but they were geniuses because they knew that they were not perfect-and times change. They created a flexible, living document. And most of all the President is not a king but really just a bum, a servant of the people.

The Articles of Confederation Were…

Posted in Constitutional Era with tags on October 7, 2014 by mrkufs

WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK  WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK  WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK  WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK WEAK

Actors Recite the Declaration of Independence

Posted in American Revolution on October 2, 2014 by mrkufs

A gripping read of America’s most powerful words. From Mel Gibson to Whoopi Goldberg-Hollywood reads the Declaration of Independence.

Liberty Kids- Second Continental Congress

Posted in Uncategorized on October 1, 2014 by mrkufs

Boston Massacre

Posted in American Revolution with tags , , , , , on September 29, 2014 by mrkufs

This print by Paul Revere passed along all the colonies. It portrayed a scene where it looked like the British guards were a firing squad-which was not exactly the truth. This is really a first example of propaganda in America.The Boston Massacre during the American Revolution

For Friday 9/26 Steps to Revolution

Posted in Uncategorized on September 25, 2014 by mrkufs

This explains in 11 minutes the steps to the American Revolution.  Follow the events and dates.

Long Essay Choices for Thursday 9/25

Posted in Uncategorized on September 19, 2014 by mrkufs

Period 2 (UNIT 2): Long-Essay Question

ESSAY

Essay Instructions

Directions: Write a coherent, well-supported essay including a valid thesis statement and supporting body paragraphs on one of the following questions.

  1. Although both were largely settled originally by people of English origin, Massachusetts Bay and the Chesapeake Region by 1700 had evolved into two distinct (unique and different) societies. Why did this difference in development occur?
  1. To what extent and in what ways did European powers develop different patterns of colonization in North America? Support your answer with specific and relevant historical information from the period 1607 to 1754.

APUSH Period 3-Seven Years War Mr. Kufs Video

Posted in Uncategorized on September 17, 2014 by mrkufs

Key Concept 3.1- Britain’s victory over France in the Imperial Struggle for North America led to new conflicts among the British government, the North American colonists, and American Indians, culminating in the creation of a new nation-the United States.

Constitution Day Essay Contest Link

Posted in Uncategorized on September 17, 2014 by mrkufs

Here is the link for the Constitution Day essay contest.

http://view.s4.exacttarget.com/?j=fe8e157771670c7a76&m=fe9f15707367067f77&ls=fe2911707d63017f731673&l=ff981172&s=fe2515707d6d027e731372&jb=ffcf14&ju=fe601579716101797715&r=0

Albany Plan of Union

Posted in Colonial with tags , , , , on September 17, 2014 by mrkufs
English: This political cartoon (attributed to...

English: This political cartoon (attributed to Benjamin Franklin) originally appeared during the French and Indian War, but was recycled to encourage the American colonies to unite against British rule. Description taken from File:Joinordie.jpg uploaded by User:Lies5150. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Albany Plan of Union was a proposal to create a unified government for the Thirteen Colonies, suggested by Benjamin Franklin, then a senior leader of 48 and a delegate from Pennsylvania, at the Albany Congress in July 1754 in Albany, New York. More than twenty representatives of several northern and mid-Atlantic colonies had gathered to plan their defense related to the French and Indian War, the front in North America of the Seven Years War between Great Britain and France. The Plan represented an early attempt to form a union of the colonies “under one government as far as might be necessary for defense and other general important purposes.”

Source: The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin, Second Edition. Yale University Press, 1964. pp. 209-210

“Sinners At The End of An Angry God”

Posted in Colonial, Uncategorized on September 15, 2014 by mrkufs

Jonathan Edwards described in 2 minutes about his sermon and contribution to the Great Awakening in the 1740’s.

The Institution of Slavery in Colonial America and Why It Grew So Rapidly

Posted in Colonial on September 12, 2014 by mrkufs

Slave population grew RAPIDLY in colonial America, particularly in the South.  By 1750, half of Virginia’s population and 2/3 of South Carolina’s were slaves.  The rooting of the institution of slavery was of far greater importance than that of mercantilism.

The Three Factors of Why There Was An Increased Demand for Slavery:

1.  Reduced Migration-wages in England improved.

2.  Dependable Work Force- Large plantation owners were disturbed by the political demands of small farmers and indentured servants like Bacon’s Rebellion.

3.  Cheap Labor- As tobacco prices fell, rice and indigo became profitable.  To grow successfully they needed the cheapest of labor.

Slaves came to America via the Triangular Trade (see photo) via Africa.

Where Were You When the World Stopped Turning?

Posted in 9/11/01 on September 11, 2014 by mrkufs

The Alan Jackson classic “Where were you” set to images from that fateful day of September 11, 2001.

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